The appraisers at Heritage Auctions, where a 1913 Liberty Head nickel is set to be auctioned in April, certainly think so. 1912-S MS66 $37,375. $99.95. Although Fraser worked on his models for the new nickel throughout 1912, for some unknown reason Philadelphia Mint officials were not kept informed of his progress. Dad has sold him lots of coins, says he’s a great fellow[.] $24.25. As of Dec. 23, therefore, there were at least 11 pairs of 1913 Liberty Head nickels dies on hand, the 10 from San Francisco and the single set of proof dies. Quickly, Mehl established himself through advertisements in The Numismatist. “This is one of the greatest coins at that price range,” Jeff Garrett, one of two co-buyers, told UPI. Yet Dunham is not known to have ever owned one of the nickels. These classified ads ran first with an address to “Numismatic Bank” and later “The Rare Coin Company of Texas.”. The latter disposed of the individual coins to several people, including famed numismatist Eric P. Newman. In 1908, Mehl began publishing his well-received journal, Mehl’s Numismatic Monthly. Strange Inheritance: The Walton 1913 Nickel Story. Another owner was J.V. BIBLIOGRAPHY: Bowers, Q. David, "Brown key figure in '13 nickel's lore", Coin World, January 19, 1977. C $19.99 shipping. The Eliasberg specimen is the finest known 1913 Liberty Head nickel. (Aug. 5, 1927, The Coosa River News, Centre, Ala.), • By 1929, “Mr. The nickel had to wait until 1912 to find itself being issued by a mint other than Philadelphia. Get the best deal for US Liberty Nickels (1883-1913) ... 1893 PROOF LIBERTY HEAD NICKEL PCGS PR-65CAMEO A TRUE JEWEL BLACK & WHITE. The extraordinary discovery of the long-missing Walton piece, for example, is well chronicled in this book. A man named Samuel Brown worked at the mint in 1913 and also introduced all five coins at the American Numismatic Association in 1920. Printed in the “Want Ads” of the Jan. 24 issue of The Sun, Pittsburg, Kan., was: “WATCH YOUR CHANGE – I will pay $5.00 to $20.00 for a 1913 Liberty head U.S. nickel. The same ad text is in the Jan. 25 (there was no Jan. 26, Monday issue) through Jan. 29 issues of The Sun as “Kelso.” From the Jan. 30 issue, the name was changed for some reason to the incorrect “Kelson,” and “no Buffaloes wanted” was added. The 1913 Liberty Head nickel is one of only five known to exist. The second advertisement did raise, one supposes, a few eyebrows but again it was barely a ripple in the American numismatic river. (April 27, 1924, Jackson News, Jackson, Mich.), • No need for two rabbits, giant or otherwise? However, they are also highly counterfeited. In December 1919, however, Samuel W. Brown, by now a former employee of the Philadelphia Mint, placed an advertisement in The Numismatist offering to purchase one or more of the 1913 Liberty Head nickels for $500 each. Landis also asked if there were to be any Liberty Head nickels coined in 1913. On March 9, 1962, Walton died in a car crashen route to a coin show. Through 1920, numismatic activity was little, if any, better, but in the 1920s and early 1930s one man and one coin, were key factors that brought new life to old hobby. On Nov. 25 the Philadelphia engraving department mailed 10 pairs of dies to San Francisco for the projected 1913 coinage of nickels; they arrived toward the end of that month. He received little notice for this because in those days, collectors sometimes looked for coins that had never existed, much like mid-19th century attempts to find an 1815 cent or 1804 half dollar. After the convention ended little was heard of the new coins for several years but in 1924 dealer August Wagner, acting on commission, offered the entire set of coins for sale. If Kelso’s flurry of advertisements in these two Kansas newspapers came about from his having viewed one of Brown’s The Numismatist ads, the young man may have seized on what he believed was a chance to make a dandy profit. So what of the 1913 Liberty Head nickels after the ANA convention in 1920? That coin was the 1913 Liberty Head (In the 1920s and early 1930s, one man and one coin were key factors that brought new life to old hobby. Free ... 40 Coins - Rare Nickel Roll! BIBLIOGRAPHY: Bowers, Q. David, "Brown key figure in '13 nickel's lore", Coin World, January 19, 1977. One might suggest Christmas Eve, when security would perhaps been a little lax in line with the general tenor of the season. This 1913 Century Liberty Head Nickel also has a gigantic price tag. Col. Green died in 1936 and the set of coins, once the legal formalities had been taken care of by an army of lawyers, wound up in the hands of St. Louis dealer Burdette G. Johnson. The April 15, 1923, Buffalo Courier, Buffalo, N.Y., for example, ran: “COINS – $50 paid for 1913 liberty nickels (not Buffalo); cash premiums paid for all rare coins; send 4c for circular; may mean your profit. Of the five 1913 Liberty Head nickels, two have proof surfaces, and the other three were produced with standard striking techniques. The year 1913 was when the old Liberty head or “V” design was replaced by the new Buffalo design — no Liberty nickels with a 1913 date were supposed to be produced. The nature of this clandestine coinage does not lead to records being kept so we are in the dark, and probably will remain so, for the exact day that the operation was successfully carried out. ; Long Island, Kan.; Topeka, Kan.; Wichita, Kan.; Detroit; Lansing, Mich.; Muskegon, Mich.; Port Huron, Mich.; Bismarck, N.D.; Buffalo, N.Y.; Antlers, Okla.; Muskogee, Okla.; Chambersburg, Pa.; Harrisburg, Pa.; Newcastle, Pa.; Wilkes-Barre, Pa.; Salt Lake City, Utah; La Crosse, Wis.; and Cheyenne, Wyo. 1913 Type I Buffalo nickel VF. Starting with his first mail-bid sale in 1906, he was soon selling named collections such as, in no particular order, Granberg, Newcomer, Sears, Ten Eyck, Grinnell, Olsen, and Dunham. It is believed that he used coin dies created in case the dies for the Buffalo nickel were not ready for production in time. ), The king of the 1913 Liberty Head nickel $50 offer, and the one many others likely followed in quoting that value, was Fort Worth, Texas, dealer B. Max Mehl. The Secretary not only was determined to carry out the idea but also picked the man to do the job: famed artist and sculptor James Earle Fraser. The same would be true if he somehow learned of the rare nickel from a CCC member. The king of the 1913 Liberty Head nickel $50 offer, and the one many others likely followed in quoting that value, was Fort Worth, Texas, dealer B. Max Mehl. (It currently resides in PCGS capsule number 999999-001.) that if he wrote to the Ace Coin Co. of Wheeling, W.Va., he could get $50 for his 1913 nickel. Despite her distress, “Just Me” found time to close her letter with a question as to the 1913 nickel’s worth. The recorded statement from Dunham can be read two ways: Either he was offered $600 for his nickel at the ANA banquet, or he was offered $600 sometime that day (Tuesday, Aug. 24). 2.) It was the usual practice for the Denver and San Francisco superintendents to order the necessary dies for the coming year well in advance of January 1. (May 27, 1923, Augusta Chronicle, Augusta, Fla.), • Need a rabbit? In 1926, Peter Schoblocker and Valentine Heigel of Jacksonport, Wis., proffered the same in their classified ad: “TAKING IN TRADE – 1913 nickel liberty head (not buffalo) or 1894 dime. This is the second part of a two-part feature on the earliest known showing of the 1913 Liberty Head nickel and the spread of the coin’s popularity. Sections of newspapers the Aug. 31, 1920, Suburbanite Economist how to in... Quickly, Mehl ’ s seemingly huge price tag was allegedly a bargain 1913 edition were made and introduced public... At auction for more than $ 3.1 million at a Philadelphia auction for home on Aug. 23, Bob thinking. To E-Sylum editor Wayne Homren, who willingly loaned his Specimen in 1948 mentioned in Numismatist! Proof surfaces, and she knows what to do collector Louis Eliasberg bought his in. That time Wayne Homren, who willingly loaned his Specimen for display on numerous occasions eccentric - very! 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